T10FB Redux: August 24, 1970 – KDWB Minneapolis/St. Paul

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Originally written August 13, 2013.

Hello once again, and welcome to Top 10 Flashback, an honored tradition since July 2013.  I’m your host, Dick Fitzwell.

This week, we will go back to a superb year in music, 1970, and count down the top ten songs from this week using that music industry bible, the playlist of AM 630, KDWB in Minneapolis/St. Paul.  This is what sweet, delectable, eminently fuckable Mary Richards may have been listening to in her Mustang on the way to work at WJM-TV.

You’re gonna make it after all, so on with the countdown!

#10:
Blood, Sweat & Tears – Hi-De-Ho

I really like BS&T, and while this is a good song, there are many others I’d rather hear.  This was the last of their three good albums.

#9:
Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young – Ohio

This song was written, recorded, and released just days after the infamous Kent State incident.  No Internet yet, which makes it all the more amazing.

#8:
Temptations – Ball Of Confusion

Another great protest song, and unlike many, this one holds up well today.  Norman Whitfield was on fire at this time, and was one of the greatest record producers there ever was.  I had this 45 when I was 8; I thought “tax deduction” was a pretty cool phrase to have in a song.

#7:
Five Stairsteps – O-O-H Child

I fucking LOVE this song.  Nobody seems to do optimism any more, and this has it in spades, along with a fantastic melody, wonderful harmony, superb musicianship, and the best production Chicago had to offer.  A stone classic.  Have I fellated this song enough?

#6:
Chicago – 25 Or 6 To 4

There is not a bad song in this countdown.  In case you never figured out the meaning of the song, it’s about insomnia and being awake at 3:34-3:35 am.  Guitar solo by Terry Kath, who lost big playing Russian roulette in January 1978.

#5:
Stevie Wonder – Signed, Sealed, Delivered I’m Yours

And the Motown machine of awesomeness just kept rolling along.  It wasn’t just an Eddie Murphy punchline – Stevie Wonder really was/is a musical genius.

#4:
Mungo Jerry – In The Summertime

It took a long time, but British skiffle finally made a splash in America, at least for one song.  True story:  I won this 45 from a Detroit station, WWWW 106.7 (a/k/a W4), when I was 8.  The contest was called “Name It And Claim It,” and I was the first caller to correctly identify the song when they played it.  They sent it to me in a padded envelope, and the fucking record was warped and skipped like crazy on my crappy record player.  No matter, I won it from W4, and how many other kids could say that?

#3:
Eric Burdon & War – Spill The Wine

This song blew my little eight year old mind.  Had this 45, too, and it had an extra verse you never hear on the radio.  The version in the video above is straight from an original 45, and contains that extra verse.  By the way, it’s “spill the wine, TAKE that girl.”

#2:
Edwin Starr – War

Three protest songs in the top ten, two of which are from Motown.  This is without question the most timeless of the three, and it kicks ass!

http://thebig8.net/number_1_then_and_number_1_now.mp3 <—Number 1 then, and number 1 now!

And now, ladies and gentlemen, the number one song 43 years ago this week, aS determined by KDWB in Minneapolis/St. Paul:

Yes, kids, it once was possible to write a love song without mentioning how much you like her tits, ass, and pussy and how badly you want to fuck her.  Of course, some people thought “I wanna make it with you” meant just that.

Well, there you go.  The best countdown yet.  Absolutely no duds.  Music ruled in 1970!

Thanks for listening.  Post your thoughts below.

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